Photo by Drew Beamer on Unsplash

How Alex Fights His Dyscalculia

Photo by Drew Beamer on Unsplash
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This story tells us of a normal child with a mathematics disability familiar to thousands of children and their parents. It is not aimed to hurt or stigmatise anyone. One could write about dyslexia in almost the same way as dyscalculia is explained to you here.


Alexander looks forward to school


Alexander is a cheerful, bright child. After two years of nursery school he is happy to be able to go to the first lesson together with his classmates. At school he learns quickly. He likes gymnastics, reading and doing small experiments. Only calculating seems hard to him. Somehow the numbers just don‘t get in Alexander’s head. It does not seem logical to him that you have to write “23” and not “twenty-three”.

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Photo by George Pagan III on Unsplash

TEDx Talk: A Dyscalculic Explains her World

We have been fortunate to run several extremely informative guest posts here on the Dyscalculia Blog from educators and researchers on their work with dyscalculia. Today we would like to share a TEDx Talk we discovered on YouTube given by someone who is actually dyscalculic.

Line Rothman, a graduate of the creative business and design school Kaospilot in Aarhus, Denmark, takes her listeners on a tour of her “world without numbers” in a manner that is charming, touching, and enlightening all at once.


Famous dyscalculics

Dyscalculics: The Famous, The Successful, The Inspiring

As dyscalculia is less diagnosed than dyslexia, it is less present when it comes to information and resources on websites and blogs. Dyslexics, for example, can find extensive lists of famous people who have or were reported to have had dyslexia. Dyscalculics are left more on their own when looking for such sources of encouragement and inspiration.


 

 

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