Dyscalculics: The Famous, The Successful, The Inspiring

As the condition is rarer than dyslexia, dyscalculia is less present when it comes to information and resources on websites and blogs. Dyslexics, for example, can find extensive lists of famous people who have or were reported to have had dyslexia. Dyscalculics are left more on their own when looking for such sources of encouragement and inspiration.

A search for famous dyscalculics does turn up a few names. American actor Henry Winkler is mentioned as having both dyslexia and difficulty with math. Singers Cher and Mick Hucknall are both dyscalculic. Actress Mary Tyler Moore is also included on lists of celebrities with dyscalculia. These lists however are much shorter than comparable ones dealing with dyslexia.

Famous dyscalculic: singer Cher.
Famous dyscalculic: singer Cher.

When faced with such a dearth of information, dyscalculics may instead have to look elsewhere for inspiration. Namely, among themselves. As awareness of dyscalculia grows, so too does awareness of the challenges faced by people with this learning difference and respect for how they deal with those challenges.

Learning about dyscalculics like Jack Harley-Walsh, who didn’t let his learning differences keep him from scaling either educational or actual peaks, can inspire other students with dyscalculia to push their own limits. It can be enormously encouraging to read blogger Savannah Treviño’s article on her own success as a student because and not despite of her dyscalculia.

To our dyscalculic readers: who are your role models and inspirations? If you would like to share your own story about what gives you motivation and encouragement please chime in via the comments below.

10 thoughts on “Dyscalculics: The Famous, The Successful, The Inspiring

  • November 26, 2017 at 12:17 pm
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    Dear nam/sir ,found your website very informative.i m.a mother of 10 yr old boy who z still facing lots of problems in maths especially for identifying ascending n decending order,decimals n word problems .he doesnt understand the simple concept s n try to mug up things ,i dont know weather he z weak in maths or these r any how related to any problem.i m in great dilemma n tension now within few months he will go to grace 5 when maths z really going to b a challenge for him.kindly let me know few ways by which i can identify the problem at home n remedies or solutions to improve his maths still .plz help me out i have tried many things but its not working out.i stay in a area where dont have acess to any counsellors so kindly help me with the suggestion s which i can myself try with him to improve his maths concepts n speed.eagerly waiting for your reply.regards… namy.

    Reply
  • December 6, 2017 at 7:47 pm
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    I have only just been diagnosed aged 42 but prior to this I attained a postgraduate Master’s degree in Applied Social Studies and practised for 7 years as a qualified social worker. Despite my everyday struggles, my strength in writing/literacy and my empathy have carried me through and I am now considering training as a counsellor.

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    • December 7, 2017 at 11:21 am
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      Thank you for leaving this comment! It’s always great to hear from someone who has battled through the difficulties of dyscalculia and its an inspiration to know that someone with such life experience will be helping others!

      Thanks again,
      James

      Reply
    • December 19, 2017 at 7:49 am
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      I just got diagnosed recently with Dyscalculia. I’m 47 and got post grad cert fairly easily but started struggling with Msc. I’m not sure if I will be able to continue with research but will take all the help I can get from the University. It’s certainly answered a lot of questions I’ve been having since about the age of 7. Still processing all this though. Nonverbal processing is also poor.

      Reply
  • January 14, 2018 at 3:59 am
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    Hi, I’ve been trying to find more articles about dyscalculia that could help me with my thesis. Unfortunately, it is not as common as dyslexia like what you’ve said here. I’m taking Masters in teaching Math and I’d like to find a valid tool being used in assessing possible students with dyscalculia. Pls help me find one. Thank you.

    Reply

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