My Educational Journey, Mark Daly

Mark’s story of achievement from a diagnosis of dyscalculia and lack of support in school to becoming an advocate for adult education. 


“This is a film about my journey in education. It connects my past to my present, from primary school to secondary school to third level and all the challenges I faced in the Irish education system without educational support and the difficulties of finding a job. My unhappiness at home and how I returned to education as an adult and became an ambassador for lifelong learning.”

Mark Daly, ambassador for lifelong learning.

Dyscalculia on Twitch – Interview with @JJlass1

@JJlass1 tweeted at us the announcement of their Twitch proposal to include Dyspraxia, Dyscalculia and Dysgraphia in the newly launched release of new tags. We thought this was a brilliant idea and wanted to share this interview with JJlass1 to raise awareness, interest and the reasons why this is important.


Photo by Caspar Camille Rubin on Unsplash
Read more

What Have Eyes Got To Do With Dyscalculia?

About a decade ago, a groundbreaking study found that eye pupils detect more than just light. New research by the School of Psychology of the University of Sydney in collaboration with the Universities of Pisa and Florence has revealed that eye pupils can also detect quantity and perceive the number of objects in a person’s field of vision.


Photo by v2osk on Unsplash

Read more

‘Dancing with Dyscalculia’ aka dwdyscalculia


Hi dwdyscalculia! Could you introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about your Instagram?


Hi! My name is Isabelle, I’m 20 years old and I work as a qualified freelance makeup artist in New Zealand. I was diagnosed with severe Dyscalculia (Acalculia) when I was around 11 years old. My Dyscalculia is not genetic, as I was born premature (25 weeks) and suffered a brain bleed, thus causing me to have Dyscalculia as a result. I was able to get specific tutoring for my Dyscalculia, in order to help me learn numeracy skills (this aided in me passing NCEA – similar to GCSE’s) Since being diagnosed, I have been a strong advocate for Dyscalculics.


Posts from dwdyscalculia’s Instagram

I created my Instagram ‘Dancing with Dyscalculia’ when I was around 15 years old (also known as dwdyscalculia), to help educate and raise awareness of Dyscalculia. What better way to educate and raise awareness, create a discussion about certain topics in this day in age, than social media? I create and post textual descriptions with snippets of information about Dyscalculia, in order to help raise awareness. I will sometimes post questions relating to Dyscalculia and answer them. I also often answer questions relating to Dyscalculia in comments as well.

Read more

Educational Associated Anxiety by Mark Daly

Nobody really discusses educational associated anxiety. This is separate from my more general anxiety. My mother would ask or try to ask me how was school today and just did not want to talk about it. There were no school counsellors when I went to school. The secondary school I attended was academically very strict. We were there to open our books face the front of the class and shut up. 


Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash
Read more

Research On Dyscalculia Is Still Growing

Ok so maybe it’s a slow grower, but since we started this blog there have been some leaps in research and overall there is a little higher general awareness of dyscalculia. We thought we would give you a little rundown of the latest research related to dyscalculia over the last years and perhaps this will help us see what the future may hold for dyscalculics the world over!


Photo by Edward Howell on Unsplash

Back in 2018, some researchers at the University of Bonn were up to some, quite frankly mind-boggling stuff. So we are born with the ability to count and shortly after birth, babies can estimate the number of events and even perform simple calculations. But what exactly happens in the brain? And do we process abstract numbers differently from concrete quantities? To answer these questions the researchers measured the reaction of individual nerve cells to quantities and were able to demonstrate that certain nerve cells fired in response to very specific quantities. With the possibility to study the individual nerve cells of the brain and the discovery that counting is done on such a scale, the researchers hope that their results will contribute to a better understanding of dyscalculia.

Read more

Dyscalculia… A Logic Challenge?

Guest article by Kevin Wiltshire

To make sense of my thoughts as a potentially dyscalculic adult – who faces specific challenges with logical thinking – I probably need to start with some context. 


Photo by Sigmund on Unsplash

Early Challenges

At primary school, long division took me years to master, and there were always strange little things I just didn’t get or couldn’t do that others found easy (despite me apparently starting off well ahead in intellectual maturity and reading age)… I also always lost at Monopoly! Nevertheless, apart from a few such uncomfortable wobbles and blocks, I was able to keep up well into secondary school, even taking a couple of exams early. 

Read more

The Inability to Read a Clock Because of My Learning Disability

A guest article from Michelle Steiner – first published and edited on The Mighty


Photo by Moritz Kindler on Unsplash

My math learning disability presents a variety of challenges, but the most difficult one is not being able to read the face of a clock. Many people don’t understand that I can’t do this. I have had generous people gift me with beautiful antique analogue clocks. But I am unable to read what time it is and other than decoration, they serve little purpose for me.

I struggled with learning how to read a clock in elementary school. I can remember learning to tell time to the hour, but anything beyond that never made sense. I dreaded the worksheets that I had to tell what time it was, but I loved the colourful clock that you could move the handles.

Read more