Popular Math Apps in the Resource Classroom: Why I Chose Not To Use Them

This is a guest article from Special Education Teacher Monise Seward, you can find out more about her work on her website – http://www.moniseseward.com/

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For the last 8 months, my IG and Twitter posts have focused on two main goals; find (a) Dyscalculia and Dyslexia training; and (b) Math Apps and/or curriculum designed with my students’ needs in mind. Both proved to be challenging and time-consuming endeavours, eventually I found one.

Dyscalculia is the Learning Disability you’ve probably never heard of, despite the fact that 5-10% of the population has it. Based on the challenges non-identified students experience, I believe there are more kids (and adults) with Dyscalculia. We simply characterize their struggles as ‘Math anxiety’; at least, in this country. Based on conversations had with U.S. teachers, few are aware of the existence of Dyscalculia. They are unable to identify the characteristics exhibited by students who may have it. Compounded by a lack of training on Dyscalculia, many teachers adhere to a pacing guide that does not allow time for remediation or accommodations.

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Dyscalculia Resources For Those Going To High School

Now I’m sure every parent goes through the stressful shift from primary school to high school and the fears of this change being to much for their child, but there is extra pressure for those with children that have learning difficulties. This is because there will always be a difference between the support your child received at primary school and what’s available at the high school. So we have prepared a list of recommended resources that are suitable for this transition period and for supporting your child throughout their time in high school.


  1. ‘TES’ is always a good place to look for any resource you may need, but this collection is also especially for those with dyscalculia. These are not just for teachers; they are useful for those homeschooling or even just that little bit of extra after school or weekend boost for your child.


  2. ‘Helping With Math’ is another good site for all your mathematical resources, this site is especially great because of the huge collection of exercises available for free, and while the resources may not be the most beautiful, they are extremely useful.


  3. ‘Dybuster Calcularis’ learning software lays a secure foundation for mathematics and is suitable for use at home and school. It represents a unique way of assisting the brain in essential learning and maturation processes and helps tackle mathematical anxieties and dyscalculia, best of all you can try it out for free here.


  4. ‘Overcoming Difficulties with Number: Supporting Dyscalculia and Students Who Struggle with Maths’This little maths book with CD is highly recommended and seems to be just the ticket for anyone interested in homeschooling, even though it is not free.


  5. ‘Dyscalculia Screener and Guidance, Helping you Identify Pupils with Dyscalculic Tendencies’ This for the professionals out there: teachers, assessment coordinators and SENCOs. It is an ideal tool used for screening an entire year group and comes with a handbook full of practical tips and guidance.


  6. ‘IPSEA’ (Independent Parental Special Education Advice) is full of resources of all kinds to help families get the right education for their children and it’s the perfect place to get advice whether you have problems with schools or disability discrimination.

Join The Dyscalculia Support Group!

A few weeks back we were asked through Dyscalculia Blog about online support groups for adults with dyscalculia. I found a great group on Facebook that could possibly help, but this was not its main focus. So we decided to set up our own Facebook group, where we can support each other, ask questions, post helpful resources and talk all things dyscalculia whether it is about your child or yourself!

Dyscalculia can affect anyone and this is a great starting point as a lot of people are discovering that they have dyscalculia late in life and they realise all the struggles it caused them. They are unsure how to tackle these difficulties and it can be hard to find useful information, but now we can help each other using this Dyscalculia Support Group as a tool.

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What Is Dyscalculia And How Can Technology Help With Its Symptoms?

Dybuster Calcularis – Specifically designed for those with dyscalculia.

What is Dyscalculia?

Dyscalculia affects around 5% of children, a smaller proportion than those affected by dyslexia (the rate of occurrence for dyslexia in the United States is approximately 15%). This has resulted in dyscalculia remaining relatively unknown; many people are not even familiar with the term.

What effect could this have on children with dyscalculia? Imagine struggling every day at school with number problems that your peers master far more quickly than you do. Your teacher is beginning to lose patience with you and your parents think you are just not trying hard enough. They don´t understand that you are trying hard every day, but even basic arithmetic concepts make no sense to you. You are called lazy or stupid or both.

This is the reality for many students with dyscalculia. With awareness of this learning disability still low, children may not be diagnosed as dyscalculic and not receive intervention that could help them succeed in the classroom.

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Beat the Back to School Anxiety!

Photo by Roman Mager on Unsplash

So school begins again for a lot of children around the world and we would like to help them be prepared and gain confidence in their abilities before school starts! This article is mainly targeted for those that have difficulties with maths, but I’m sure everyone will find it useful to warm up those brains.

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Back To School: Numberphile

Now we have written about Numberphile before and its page on dyscalculia with Professor Brian Butterworth of University College London discussing how dyscalculia manifests itself, the signs of dyscalculia, and current research on the topic. It’s a great introduction to and overview of dyscalculia, so take a look if you haven’t seen it yet.

Today we are going to introduce you to a few videos which can get your children prepared and their brains warmed up for going back to school!

The first of the videos is perhaps more suitable for a person at high school level as it involves some algebra, but in saying that the video is very fun and entertaining with some animations helping to describe the maths and theory making it clear and interesting for younger ages.

  1. Catching Money (Reaction Times)

 

The second video is a series of fun magic tricks, which is a great activity you can try at home using a strip of paper, two rubber bands and two paper clips. Certainly a great way to show off to your friends and educational!

2. Perplexing Paperclips

 

In at number three, save time on your school mornings by learning this little mathematical trick to tying your shoelaces ultra quick!

3. Super-fast way to tie Shoelaces

Top 5 Myths of Dyscalculia & Dyslexia

All kids who reverse their b’s & d’s or their numbers have dyslexia or dyscalculia.

Failure to read or do maths is often more to do with the nature of teaching rather than the nature of the child. A child will not develop dyslexia or dyscalculia because he has trouble reading.

Multi-sensory exercises can help struggling students to strengthen their brain activity, but this will not cure their dyslexia or dyscalculia.

It is also not a dietary problem. No amount of healthy green juices or other wholesome foods will reverse the conditions, but that does not mean you can eat unhealthily! In fact, a healthy diet can improve your concentration and may help you control the conditions, so keep eating those greens, its and seeds!

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Stress Management Tips for Seniors with Dyslexia or Dyscalculia

Photo by Matthew Bennett on Unsplash

Stress Management Tips for Seniors with Dyslexia or Dyscalculia

When people talk about dyslexia and dyscalculia, they are usually concerned about how they affect people who are in the developmental stages of life, such as children and adolescents. However, these disabilities can also occur in elderly people. Dyslexia and dyscalculia can make it significantly more difficult for seniors to perform certain activities and live a normal life, resulting in considerable stress and frustration. Here is some useful information on stress management with dyslexia or dyscalculia.

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Dyscalculia & Maths Resources For Adults

It can be difficult to find much about or for adults on the subject of dyscalculia, previously we had a guest post from educator Sarah Jarvis covering the topic of Helping Adults with Mathematical Learning Difficulties, which is a great introduction to the subject if you have not read it yet.

We have decided to dig deeper on the subject and find more resources and more ways of overcoming this difficulty with maths and here it is:

Firstly its good to get yourself mentally prepared for the task of challenging your mathematical difficulties so please keep in mind these four things:

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