What is Dyscalculia and how can Technology help with its Symptoms?


What is Dyscalculia?

Dyscalculia affects around 5% of children, a smaller proportion than those affected by dyslexia (the rate of occurrence for dyslexia in the United States is approximately 15%). This has resulted in dyscalculia remaining relatively unknown; many people are not even familiar with the term.

What effect could this have on children with dyscalculia? Imagine struggling every day at school with number problems that your peers master far more quickly than you do. Your teacher is beginning to lose patience with you and your parents think you are just not trying hard enough. They don´t understand that you are trying hard every day, but even basic arithmetic concepts make no sense to you. You are called lazy or stupid or both.

This is the reality for many students with dyscalculia. With awareness of this learning disability still low, children may not be diagnosed as dyscalculic and not receive intervention that could help them succeed in the classroom.

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Top 10 Best Back to School Resources for Teachers

Photo by Megan Soule on Unsplash

School is here and its not just the students who need to prepare for their return its also the teachers! So Dybuster has compiled a helpful list of the top ten online resources for all you educators out there enabling you and your students to have a great start to the year.

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Beat the Back to School Anxiety!

Photo by Roman Mager on Unsplash

So school begins again for a lot of children around the world and we would like to help them be prepared and gain confidence in their abilities before school starts! This article is mainly targeted for those that have difficulties with maths, but I’m sure everyone will find it useful to warm up those brains.

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Back To School: Numberphile

Now we have written about Numberphile before and its page on dyscalculia with Professor Brian Butterworth of University College London discussing how dyscalculia manifests itself, the signs of dyscalculia, and current research on the topic. It’s a great introduction to and overview of dyscalculia, so take a look if you haven’t seen it yet.

Today we are going to introduce you to a few videos which can get your children prepared and their brains warmed up for going back to school!

The first of the videos is perhaps more suitable for a person at high school level as it involves some algebra, but in saying that the video is very fun and entertaining with some animations helping to describe the maths and theory making it clear and interesting for younger ages.

  1. Catching Money (Reaction Times)


The second video is a series of fun magic tricks, which is a great activity you can try at home using a strip of paper, two rubber bands and two paper clips. Certainly a great way to show off to your friends and educational!

2. Perplexing Paperclips


In at number three, save time on your school mornings by learning this little mathematical trick to tying your shoelaces ultra quick!

3. Super-fast way to tie Shoelaces

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Top 5 Myths of Dyscalculia & Dyslexia

http://guillellano.com/All kids who reverse their b’s & d’s or their numbers have dyslexia or dyscalculia.

Failure to read or do maths is often more to do with the nature of teaching rather than the nature of the child. A child will not develop dyslexia or dyscalculia because he has trouble reading.

Multi-sensory exercises can help struggling students to strengthen their brain activity, but this will not cure their dyslexia or dyscalculia.

It is also not a dietary problem. No amount of healthy green juices, or other wholesome foods will reverse the conditions, but that does not mean you can eat unhealthily! In fact a healthy diet can improve your concentration and may help you control the conditions, so keep eating those greens, its and seeds!

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Stress Management Tips for Seniors with Dyslexia or Dyscalculia

Eepeng Cheong

Stress Management Tips for Seniors with Dyslexia or Dyscalculia

When people talk about dyslexia and dyscalculia, they are usually concerned about how they affect people who are in the developmental stages of life, such as children and adolescents. However, these disabilities can also occur in elderly people. Dyslexia and dyscalculia can make it significantly more difficult for seniors to perform certain activities and live a normal life, resulting in considerable stress and frustration. Here is some useful information on stress management with dyslexia or dyscalculia.

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Dyscalculia & Maths Resources For Adults

It can be difficult to find much about or for adults on the subject of dyscalculia, previously we had a guest post from educator Sarah Jarvis covering the topic of Helping Adults with Mathematical Learning Difficulties, which is a great introduction to the subject if you have not read it yet.

We have decided to dig deeper on the subject and find more resources and more ways of overcoming this difficulty with maths and here it is:


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Dyscalculia & Other Ds: SpLD Central, Thursday June 29th 2017

DYSCALCULIA AND OTHER Ds: SpLD Central, Thursday June 29th 2017

On 29th June 2017 Crossbow Education host the third SpLD Central conference and exhibition, at Yarnfield Park in Staffordshire, UK. The keynote speaker this year is Prof Steve Chinn, who will be presenting the two morning sessions on dyscalculia and maths learning difficulties. Prof. Chinn has lectured and provided INSETs and CPD in some 30 countries worldwide and has been a keynote speaker at many major conferences. He set up the first Post Graduate Certificate course in the UK for maths and dyslexia which was accredited by the BDA for the AMBDA (Numeracy). The course was validated by MMU (4 Masters modules at M level) and was delivered for 4 years under Mark College’s Beacon School funding.

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Our Top 5 Blog Posts on Dyscalculia

For this week’s post we went back into the blog archives to find our content on dyscalculia that has proved most useful to our readers. We’d like to share these articles here as the ones that, going by popularity and response in the comments, resonate the most with our audience. Thank you for reading!

1. Helping Adults with Maths Learning Difficulties

Our top post is a guest post from educator Sarah Jarvis and she covers a topic on which it can be difficult to find in-depth information: adult math learning difficulties. The post lists reasons why adults may be struggling with maths such as poor schooling, maths anxiety and visual stress difficulties, how dyscalculia could remain undiagnosed in many adults and what you can do to help yourself or someone with dyscalculia/maths difficulties.

2. Dyscalculics: The Famous, The Successful, The Inspiring

In at number two: The Famous, The Successful, The Inspiring. Well-known dyscalculics, leading us to think that there is a need for spotlighting dyscalculic role models. Singer Cher and actress Mary Tyler Moore make the list of famous people with dyscalculia.

There is plenty of information on famous dyslexics available but much less on dyscalculics. We try to share examples of success achieved by dyscalculics not only in this post but also in our weekly round-ups. Read more.


3. What is it Like to Have Dyscalculia?

This post looks more deeply into the struggles dyscalculics face. A special focus is given to those difficulties caused when a child is dyscalculic but the condition goes unrecognised or misunderstood at home and school. This can lead to deep feelings of anxiety and a lack of confidence in a dyscalculic child. Hopefully as dyscalculia becomes better understood, support and intervention will also increase. Read more.


4. Dyscalculia: The Secret Behind IKEA’s Product Names.

The founder of IKEA, Ingvar Kamprad, who is known to have suffered from dyscalculia. The traditional numeral product codes used in most business seemed like a unending nightmare to him. To avoid the challenging typing of numbers in the computer system, he decided to name his products using names! This example shows that dyscalculia does not have to automatically be a hinderance and that the experience of having a disability can also shape innovative approaches to common situations and lead to extraordinary careers. Read More here.

5. Homeschooling and Dyscalculia

While some dyscalculics receive the support and intervention they need from their teachers and therapists, others struggle with their schools’ lack of resources or awareness. In the latter case, parents of dyscalculic children may consider homeschooling if this is a legal option where they live. This post covers it all read more.

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6 Tips to Make Maths Fun!

Most children find mathematics interesting and to encourage their interest is simpler than you think, as mathematics is a big part of everyday life. In this article we are offering you some ideas, how to create a playful link between mathematics and daily routine.

Photo Credit: Kotatsu Neko 808 Flickr via Compfight cc

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