Top 5 Myths of Dyscalculia & Dyslexia

http://guillellano.com/All kids who reverse their b’s & d’s or their numbers have dyslexia or dyscalculia.

Failure to read or do maths is often more to do with the nature of teaching rather than the nature of the child. A child will not develop dyslexia or dyscalculia because he has trouble reading.

Multi-sensory exercises can help struggling students to strengthen their brain activity, but this will not cure their dyslexia or dyscalculia.

It is also not a dietary problem. No amount of healthy green juices, or other wholesome foods will reverse the conditions, but that does not mean you can eat unhealthily! In fact a healthy diet can improve your concentration and may help you control the conditions, so keep eating those greens, its and seeds!

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Stress Management Tips for Seniors with Dyslexia or Dyscalculia

Eepeng Cheong

Stress Management Tips for Seniors with Dyslexia or Dyscalculia

When people talk about dyslexia and dyscalculia, they are usually concerned about how they affect people who are in the developmental stages of life, such as children and adolescents. However, these disabilities can also occur in elderly people. Dyslexia and dyscalculia can make it significantly more difficult for seniors to perform certain activities and live a normal life, resulting in considerable stress and frustration. Here is some useful information on stress management with dyslexia or dyscalculia.

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Dyscalculia & Maths Resources For Adults

It can be difficult to find much about or for adults on the subject of dyscalculia, previously we had a guest post from educator Sarah Jarvis covering the topic of Helping Adults with Mathematical Learning Difficulties, which is a great introduction to the subject if you have not read it yet.

We have decided to dig deeper on the subject and find more resources and more ways of overcoming this difficulty with maths and here it is:

 

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Dyscalculia & Other Ds: SpLD Central, Thursday June 29th 2017

DYSCALCULIA AND OTHER Ds: SpLD Central, Thursday June 29th 2017

On 29th June 2017 Crossbow Education host the third SpLD Central conference and exhibition, at Yarnfield Park in Staffordshire, UK. The keynote speaker this year is Prof Steve Chinn, who will be presenting the two morning sessions on dyscalculia and maths learning difficulties. Prof. Chinn has lectured and provided INSETs and CPD in some 30 countries worldwide and has been a keynote speaker at many major conferences. He set up the first Post Graduate Certificate course in the UK for maths and dyslexia which was accredited by the BDA for the AMBDA (Numeracy). The course was validated by MMU (4 Masters modules at M level) and was delivered for 4 years under Mark College’s Beacon School funding.

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Our Top 5 Blog Posts on Dyscalculia

For this week’s post we went back into the blog archives to find our content on dyscalculia that has proved most useful to our readers. We’d like to share these articles here as the ones that, going by popularity and response in the comments, resonate the most with our audience. Thank you for reading!

1. Helping Adults with Maths Learning Difficulties

Our top post is a guest post from educator Sarah Jarvis and she covers a topic on which it can be difficult to find in-depth information: adult math learning difficulties. The post lists reasons why adults may be struggling with maths such as poor schooling, maths anxiety and visual stress difficulties, how dyscalculia could remain undiagnosed in many adults and what you can do to help yourself or someone with dyscalculia/maths difficulties.

2. Dyscalculics: The Famous, The Successful, The Inspiring

In at number two: The Famous, The Successful, The Inspiring. Well-known dyscalculics, leading us to think that there is a need for spotlighting dyscalculic role models. Singer Cher and actress Mary Tyler Moore make the list of famous people with dyscalculia.

There is plenty of information on famous dyslexics available but much less on dyscalculics. We try to share examples of success achieved by dyscalculics not only in this post but also in our weekly round-ups. Read more.

 

3. What is it Like to Have Dyscalculia?

This post looks more deeply into the struggles dyscalculics face. A special focus is given to those difficulties caused when a child is dyscalculic but the condition goes unrecognised or misunderstood at home and school. This can lead to deep feelings of anxiety and a lack of confidence in a dyscalculic child. Hopefully as dyscalculia becomes better understood, support and intervention will also increase. Read more.

 

4. Dyscalculia: The Secret Behind IKEA’s Product Names.

The founder of IKEA, Ingvar Kamprad, who is known to have suffered from dyscalculia. The traditional numeral product codes used in most business seemed like a unending nightmare to him. To avoid the challenging typing of numbers in the computer system, he decided to name his products using names! This example shows that dyscalculia does not have to automatically be a hinderance and that the experience of having a disability can also shape innovative approaches to common situations and lead to extraordinary careers. Read More here.

5. Homeschooling and Dyscalculia

While some dyscalculics receive the support and intervention they need from their teachers and therapists, others struggle with their schools’ lack of resources or awareness. In the latter case, parents of dyscalculic children may consider homeschooling if this is a legal option where they live. This post covers it all read more.

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6 Tips to Make Maths Fun!

Most children find mathematics interesting and to encourage their interest is simpler than you think, as mathematics is a big part of everyday life. In this article we are offering you some ideas, how to create a playful link between mathematics and daily routine.

Photo Credit: Kotatsu Neko 808 Flickr via Compfight cc

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Dyscalculia: The Secret Behind IKEA’s Product Names.

The Swedish brand IKEA is known all around the world for its affordable furniture and household items. The Quartz news outlet discussed the success story of the brand and its system behind the unconventional products titles. The founder of IKEA, Ingvar Kamprad, who is known to have suffered from dyscalculia. The traditional numeral product codes used in most business seemed like a unending nightmare to him. To avoid the challenging typing of numbers in the computer system, he decided to name his products using letters. This lead to the invention of a naming system referencing specific semantic groups dependently on the range of the product to be titled. For instance bathroom articles are named after Swedish lakes and bodies of water, whereas bed textiles refer to flowers and plants. Today IKEA is famous around the world for its unusual product names such as Grönkulla (for bed sheets) or Knutstorp (for a chair lounge), which positively contribute to the marketing and fame of the company.

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Upcoming Dyscalculia & EdTech Conferences of 2017

Photo Credit: Larry Miller Flickr via Compfight cc

Dyscalculia, Numeracy and Maths Anxiety in HE/FE

12th April 2017, Loughborough University, UK

A one-day conference focusing on dyscalculia and maths anxiety in Further and Higher Education. The programme presents recent research in the field as well as drawing on developments and a number of case studies.

 

Les Recontres de l’Orme 2017

31st May to 1st June 2017 – Marseille, FR

The national rendezvous for digital education and cultural actors: educational policy-makers, researchers, teachers, publishers and industrialists, local authorities and associations. Excitingly they will be discussing Dybuster’s software at ORME 2017, so get yourself there and see whats happening in France!

BDA CONFERENCE – THEORY INTO PRACTICE: DYSLEXIA AND DYSCALCULIA

22nd June 2017 – London, UK

This one day conference will link the latest research and theoretical ideas to good Quality First Teaching practice. It will explore and present strategies with regard to Dyslexia and Dyscalculia, with leading experts in the field presenting the latest ideas.

 

9th National Dyscalculia and Maths Learning Difficulties Conference

29th June 2017, Cumberland Hotel, London, UK

This dyscalculia conference takes place in London and brings together special education experts, math teachers, and educational psychologists. The two keynote speakers will offer a balance of cutting edge research about dyscalculia and challenging insights into the hot topics of maths mastery learning. Attendance information available on the conference website.

 

SpLD CENTRAL Conference

29th June 2017, Staffordshire, UK

This conference will look at dyscalculia and Maths LD from both a research perspective and a classroom perspective. It will discuss definitions and describe a classroom accessible diagnosis of the factors that create difficulties in learning maths. The structure is based on decades of teaching pupils who struggled with maths. Find out more here.

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What conferences on dyslexia or dyscalculia have you attended? Please share your experiences in the comments so other readers can benefit!

Signs of Dyscalculia – A Useful Resource Outlining the Important Signs of Dyscalculia.

We have released a free online  printable resource made with Teachit Maths for teachers, professionals and for parents at home. The document highlights the 8 most common signs of dyscalculia and will help you to spot them as early as possible for the well-being of your child.

Download the PDF here for free (after registration)

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How Alex Fights his Dyscalculia

BildEinesKnaben1-200x300This story tells us of a normal child with a mathematics disability familiar to thousands of children and their parents. It is not aimed to hurt or stigmatise anyone. One could write about dyslexia in almost the same way as dyscalculia is explained to you here.

Alexander looks forward to school


Alexander is a cheerful, bright child. After two years of nursery school he is happy to be able to go to the first lesson together with his classmates. At school he learns quickly. He likes gymnastics, reading and doing small experiments. Only calculating seems hard to him. Somehow the numbers just don‘t get in Alexander’s head. It does not seem logical to him that you have to write “23” and not “twenty-three”. Read more